Farm Fresh Foods throughout Florida

Posts Tagged ‘liver’

Liver and Onions?

Saturday, November 15th, 2014

This morning while having a breakfast at my favorite diner, my waitress commented on my favorite breafast…Liver and onions. She remarked that she hardly has anyone that orders it. I noticed her accent and asked where she was from. ” I’m from Albania, and we eat liver often” I explained that most American today have largely abandoned this staple of traditional diets. Yet organ meats in general and liver in particular are nutrient SUPER stars!! Lets take a closer look

Grass-Fed Beef Liver
Liver is a storage organ for many important nutrients (Fat soluble vitamins A, D, E, K,) B-vitamins B12 and folic acid. Minerals such as magnesium, potassium and iron are just some of the many nutrients that make this a true healing food.

Due to the fact that most conventional liver comes from your typical feedlot system, I strongly urge you to source from only grass-fed beef sources. You will avoid the use of routine antibiotics and added growth hormones that is the feature of modern feedlots. This just shows the importance of knowing your local farmer, and we at farmfreshdirect2u.com know that our Florida beef is 100% grass-fed.

http://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/the-liver-files/

Saturated Fats- Your Key to Health

Monday, August 3rd, 2009

Written by Kenda Roberstson and Steve Moreau

The Truth about Saturated Fat and Cholesterol

We’ve all seen the countless warnings from the American Heart Association, American Medical Association, food conglomerates and our own doctors warning us to avoid eating saturated fat because of the “heart-disease-causing” cholesterol it contains. But have you ever stopped to ask why?

Since the dawn of time, humans have eaten a diet rich in animal fats such as butter, lard and tallow, which are loaded with saturated fatty acids.  So just what is a saturated fat?  These fats are straight chains of carbon and hydrogen that pack together easily. It is this feature that allows saturated fats to remain relatively solid at room temperature. Vegetable oils(polyunsaturated fats), however are missing various amounts of hydrogen connections and instead have a weaker double bond. Now here is the crucial part, these very same double bonds are weaker and prone to damage from heat, and excessive processing. This same weakness causes vegetable oils to form free radicals much more easily than very stable saturated fats. It is this process (free radical formation) that makes vegetable or seed oils like flaxseed go rancid. Free radicals damage results in inflammation, chronic inflammation is know recognized as the underlying cause of modern degenerative diseases.  Most saturated fat is of animal origins with the  exception of coconut oil which is a plant source of saturated fats. Grass-fed beef, free-range eggs, liver, raw dairy are excellent sources of these neglected nutrients.

So what are the facts?
•    In 1900, at least 35 percent of the calories in the American diet came from saturated dairy fats in the form of raw butter, cream and whole milk. Other sources were pastured eggs, natural pork and grass fed beef. During this time, heart disease was practically unheard of.

•    Research dating back to the 1950s indicates saturated fats are necessary for a strong immune system, healthy function of hormone levels and reproduction, for calcium to be used by the bones, and omega-3s to be used by the body properly.

•    Animal foods that contain saturated fat and cholesterol provide vital nutrients necessary for growth, energy and protection from degenerative disease. Dietary cholesterol helps strengthen the intestinal wall, which is why low-cholesterol diets can lead to intestinal disorders.

•    Cholesterol is essential for proper function of serotonin receptors in the brain. Serotonin is the body’s natural “feel-good” chemical. Low cholesterol levels have been linked to aggressive and violent behavior, depression and suicidal tendencies.

•    Mother’s milk is rich in cholesterol. Children need cholesterol-rich foods for proper brain and nervous system development.

So why is it that the United States spends more than $60 billion a year on cholesterol screening and cholesterol-lowering drugs even though a positive risk/benefit ratio for this treatment has never been established? Do your own research then…You decide!

Sources:
Cholesterol/Saturated Fats

“The Oiling of America” by Mary Enig, PhD, and Sally Fallon                                                            http://www.westonaprice.org/knowyourfats/oiling.html

Inflammation:                                                                                                            http://www.inflammationwellness.com/?cat=12 http://westonaprice.org/moderndiseases/hd.html

Traditional Diet for Babies

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2009
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Written by Kenda Roberstson and Steve Moreau

What Should You Feed Your Baby?

Many parents wonder if it is safe to feed their babies raw milk. The answer is an emphatic YES, as long as you know the raw milk comes from a clean and reliable source.

It is also best if the milk comes from cows that eat a more natural diet of green grass, hay and root vegetables.

While mother’s milk is the most ideal for your baby, raw cow’s milk produced safely is not dangerous in spite of what public health propagandists have lead you to believe. Raw milk actually contains enzymes and antibodies that make it less susceptible to bacterial contamination than pasteurized milk, while many toxins that cause diarrhea and other ailments survive the pasteurization process. Raw milk is easier for your baby to digest than pasteurized and less likely to cause cramps, constipation and allergies.

Many doctors warn that feeding cereal grains to babies too early can lead to grain allergies. Because your baby’s digestive system is better equipped to supply enzymes for digestion of fats and proteins rather than carbohydrates, baby’s first solid foods should be animal foods.

Some experts recommend feeding an egg yolk per day, starting at four months. Eggs from pasture-fed hens are rich in the omega-3 long-chain fatty acids that may be lacking in cow’s milk. These fatty acids are essential for brain development.

Cod liver oil can also be added to baby’s foods for additional omega-3s and vitamin D.

Around 10 months of age, you can introduce meats such as grass-fed beef liver, and mashed fruits and vegetables, and raw buttermilk or yogurt. Avoid fruit juices, as they are mostly sugar.

Of course your baby will come in contact with processed junk foods sooner or later. But if you help your child develop a taste for nutritious foods in infancy then he or she will make better food choices for a healthier future.

nourishing-traditions1Source: Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats by Sally Fallon with Mary G. Enig, PhD.