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Posts Tagged ‘grass-fed meat orlando’

Gut Health, Part I: Benefits & Health Implications

Tuesday, November 1st, 2016

Research has finally begun to recognize the vital importance of a healthy gut. Imbalances in gut flora have been scientifically linked to a range of health issues, impacting everything from mood and inflammation to pain and weight gain. In particular, correlations have been found between gut health and the following:

Eating Disorders – Research has uncovered a very strong link between disordered eating behaviors and gut health, specifically the presence of a certain protein made by intestinal bacteria. The presence of this protein leads to an unfavorable reaction between antibodies and satiety hormones, impacting the regulation of “feeding, energy regulation and anxiety.” Yet another reason why a healthy microbiome, i.e. balanced gut health, is vital to your health and wellness, both physically and mentally. One major way to promote and improve gut health is by consuming more probiotic and prebiotic-rich foods to feed the good gut bacteria.

Mood & Cognition – Gut health has been linked with everything from Autism and ADD/ADHD to symptoms of depression, anxiety, brain fog, even memory issues. A healthy gut is necessary for your body to properly digest and process nutrients, including playing a major role in the processing and functioning of neurotransmitter activity, including serotonin levels which are responsible for mood.

Willpower & Cravings – Do you ever feel like sometime you have excellent “willpower” to abstain from eating unhealthy foods, whereas other times you feel out of control with cravings? Your gut health plays a vital role in this.

Immune System Functioning – Over 75% of your immune system is housed within your digestive system. When you take antibiotics or use antibacterial products you are killing the good bacteria, creating a breeding ground for the bad bacteria to take over. When properly balanced, there are trillions and trillions of good bacteria keeping you healthy. When you disturb this balance, you put yourself at risk for digestive problems, poor immune system functioning, and a range of other issues.

If you are having health issues, consider the state of your gut flora. Stay tuned for our next blog article which will outline ways that you can promote gut health and improve functioning.

How to Enjoy a Healthier Holiday Meal

Wednesday, December 23rd, 2015

Here are some simple substitutions to make your Christmas dinner even more delicious – and a little bit more nutritious:

  • Eat the protein, veggies, and healthy fats first to fill up your stomach, then go for the sweet and carb-ridden items
  • Choose organic and grass-fed wherever possible – especially with turkey, ham, beef, pork, apples, potatoes, and other fruits and veggies that don’t have a protective skin. This is the best way to ensure higher nutrient content without the added dangers of antibiotics and fillers, pesticides, GMOs and chemicals. Grass-fed foods have also been shown to have significantly higher nutrient content, including valuable vitamins and minerals like omega 3 fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), vitamins B, D, E, and K, and more.
  • Substitute white sugar with raw honey and enjoy the anti-viral, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, and anti-bacterial benefits along with delicious taste
  • Skip the runny, flat, tasteless factory eggs and try a plump, nutrient-rich pastured egg instead – more flavor, more filling, and naturally rich in omega 3 fatty acids, beta carotene, vitamin A, E, D, B12, and folic acid, and is lower in saturated fat
  • Opt for grass-fed butter in your mashed potatoes, sweet potato casserole, pies, and more – it’s chock full of CLA, rich flavor, and the right ratio of Omega 3 to Omega 6 fatty acids
  • Stomach hurting after indulging in that 3rd piece of pie? Try some sauerkraut or another probiotic-rich fermented food to promote healthy digestion and restore gut health.

Bonus tip: Wheat and refined sugars wreak havoc on the body, throwing off your gut health, ph levels, appetite, and even mood and cognition.

How can you bounce back faster after a post-holiday food hangover?

Instead of reaching for a helping of leftover pie or going on a drastic starvation diet, try these simple solutions to restore balance in the body:

  • Eat lots of greens to rebalance ph levels and minimize sugar cravings
  • Eat fermented foods to restore gut health – and mood
  • Eat healthy fats like avocado, pastured butter, and coconut oil to keep your hunger satiated

What’s for Dinner: Grass-fed Lamb

Wednesday, July 15th, 2015

Looking to mix things up while providing your body a nutrient boost? Consider a tasty meal of grass-fed lamb chops.

Similar to grass-fed chicken and grass-fed beef, grass-fed lamb is higher in nutrients and lower in fat than their factory farmed, grain-fed counterparts. Other benefits include:

  • Grass-fed lamb is a complete protein, meaning it contains all 8 essential amino acids
  • Grass-fed lamb is an excellent source of niacin, zinc, iron, selenium, and B vitamins
  • Grass-fed lamb is one of the richest food sources of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) – which has been linked to improvements in immune function, blood sugar regulation, bone mass, and inflammatory function as well as reduced body fat, enhanced lean muscle building, and even cancer prevention.
  • Grass-fed lamb is an excellent source of omega-3 fats and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA – the basic building block for omega-3 fatty acids)
  • Grass-fed lamb is a staple in Mediterranean diets, which have been linked with lower incidence of cardiovascular disease
  • Roughly 40% of the fat in grass-fed lamb comes from oleic acid, a monounsaturated fat which has been associated with reduced risk of heart disease

Note: When cooking your grass-fed lamb, treat it like a very expensive cut of beef and don’t overcook it. To enjoy a moist and tender meal, the lamb should be pink on the inside when served. Shoulder cuts are good for stew, shank/breast is best braised, lamb chops or rack of lamb are best when roasted or quick broiled, and ground lamb is best when sautéed.