Farm Fresh Foods throughout Florida

Posts Tagged ‘free range eggs’

Raw Butter: The Healthy Fat Superfood

Tuesday, January 10th, 2017

Dietary fat has been villainized since the 1950s. The fact of the matter is, not all fats were created equal.  Fat from sources such as raw pastured butter, unrefined coconut oil, grass-fed beef, wild salmon, pastured eggs, and raw milk provide the body with vital macronutrients. From the endocrine system to cognition, healthy fats play a key role in functioning.

Raw butter: unheated, unprocessed, unpasteurized, un-homogenized, i.e. contains all of the vitamins, minerals, and nutrients that nature intended. It is essentially a nutritional powerhouse, chock full of vitamins and nutrients.

Furthermore, many people who are “lactose intolerant” or “casein intolerant” are able to enjoy raw pastured dairy products such as raw milk, butter, cheese, kefir, and yogurt. This is because it is actually pasteurized dairy products that are to blame for these “intolerances.” The way they have been manipulated not only robs them of essential nutrients but also enzymes that aid the body in breaking them down and absorbing said nutrients.

Raw butter and dairy products are not only safe but overall superior food sources than their factory counterparts. In fact, raw butter and dairy from pastured cows, who are allowed to roam pasture and remain free from GMOs, chemicals, pesticides, and antibiotics, are real life superfoods. Raw butter in particular is rich in a multitude of nutrients that aid in the body in a number of ways:

  • Raw butter is chock full of highly absorbable forms of Vitamin A and iodine, which are both vital nutrients for thyroid health and functioning
  • Like unrefined coconut oil, raw butter is rich in lauric, which helps with digestive problems including candida
  • Raw butter is a rich source of antioxidants which have been shown to combat cancer and protect against artery weakening
  • Raw butter is a natural source of Vitamin D, which helps promote strong bones and teeth
  • The healthy fats in raw butter help facilitate hormone disbursement in the body, i.e. promoting endocrine health
  • The healthy fats in raw butter also help improve skin complexion
  • Raw butter is a source of Conjugated Linoleic Acid which is an anti-cancer agent as well as muscle
  • Raw butter is also rich in Vitamins E and K and the mineral selenium

Farm fresh food in Orlando

Thursday, April 22nd, 2010

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Written by Kenda Roberstson and Steve Moreau


It should come as no surprise that we are in the midst of a food revolution.  The biggest move is going local.  What does that mean?  For one it means knowing your farmer, your farmer who has fresh raw milk , farm fresh eggs  and other goodies.  This idea is catching on in Florida and Orlando in particular.  Local buying clubs are growing and people are demanding wholesome quality food and florida farmers are working to meet the demands.  Farmer’s markets are growing and the  Orlando area has about 10 very popular markets.  It’s getting easier to find goat milk, raw cheese, farm fresh yogurt and much more.

Traditional Diet for Babies

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2009
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Written by Kenda Roberstson and Steve Moreau

What Should You Feed Your Baby?

Many parents wonder if it is safe to feed their babies raw milk. The answer is an emphatic YES, as long as you know the raw milk comes from a clean and reliable source.

It is also best if the milk comes from cows that eat a more natural diet of green grass, hay and root vegetables.

While mother’s milk is the most ideal for your baby, raw cow’s milk produced safely is not dangerous in spite of what public health propagandists have lead you to believe. Raw milk actually contains enzymes and antibodies that make it less susceptible to bacterial contamination than pasteurized milk, while many toxins that cause diarrhea and other ailments survive the pasteurization process. Raw milk is easier for your baby to digest than pasteurized and less likely to cause cramps, constipation and allergies.

Many doctors warn that feeding cereal grains to babies too early can lead to grain allergies. Because your baby’s digestive system is better equipped to supply enzymes for digestion of fats and proteins rather than carbohydrates, baby’s first solid foods should be animal foods.

Some experts recommend feeding an egg yolk per day, starting at four months. Eggs from pasture-fed hens are rich in the omega-3 long-chain fatty acids that may be lacking in cow’s milk. These fatty acids are essential for brain development.

Cod liver oil can also be added to baby’s foods for additional omega-3s and vitamin D.

Around 10 months of age, you can introduce meats such as grass-fed beef liver, and mashed fruits and vegetables, and raw buttermilk or yogurt. Avoid fruit juices, as they are mostly sugar.

Of course your baby will come in contact with processed junk foods sooner or later. But if you help your child develop a taste for nutritious foods in infancy then he or she will make better food choices for a healthier future.

nourishing-traditions1Source: Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats by Sally Fallon with Mary G. Enig, PhD.

Food Inc.

Wednesday, July 15th, 2009

Written by Kenda Roberstson and Steve Moreau

This movie will open your eyes to how food is produced and marketed in the US. Our industrial production model views animals as units of to be sold instead of gifts of nature who sacrifice their lives for our sustenance.

Farm fresh foods are becoming increasingly available. Local food from small farmers provide grass-fed beef, free range eggs, raw milk, and pastured chickens. Farmers markets are teeming with local organic produce of all kinds. Seek and ye will find!

The film is now in Orlando at the Regal Winter Park Village 20.
See the link below: http://www.fandango.com/food,inc._122554/movieoverview?date=

How the Pottenger Cat Study Relates to Human Health.

Wednesday, July 1st, 2009

Written by Kenda Roberstson and Steve Moreau

In 1932, Dr. Francis M. Pottenger, Jr., a physician and researcher who had successfully treated patients with TB, asthma, allergies and emphysema by putting them on a diet of raw butter, cream and eggs, decided to experiment with a raw food diet involving cats.

In one study group, the felines ate only raw milk and raw meat, while in the other groups they ate some raw meat mixed with pasteurized milk and cooked meat. During the 10-year study, Pottenger discovered that only the all-raw group maintained good health generation after generation. They had excellent bone structure, few parasites, easy pregnancies and gentle dispositions.

The groups whose diet was partially cooked developed “facial deformities,” including narrowed faces, crowded jaws, frail bones and weakened ligaments. They harbored parasites, developed diseases and had difficult pregnancies. The female cats became much more aggressive compared to those on the raw diet. The males on the other hand were unnaturally timid and exhibited lower sexual interest.  After just three generations, young animals died before reaching adulthood and stopped reproducing.

While Pottenger’s cat experiments do not mean humans should eat only raw foods, it is a testament as to the potential consequences of a diet without the nutrients provided by real grass-fed foods.  Chiefly the fat-soluble Vitamins A,D,and E. Pottenger believed that when the human diet produces facial deformities like crowded teeth, degenerative diseases will soon emerge if the diet is followed for several generations.

With western civilization’s love of refined, highly sweetened convenience foods and low-fat items, could it be that Americans are now experiencing an epidemic of degenerative diseases as a result of generations who were raised on these foods?

Preventing disease now and for generations to come is one reason we need to get back to a more natural diet consisting of grass-fed beef, free-range poultry, organic eggs and produce, raw milk and cheese – all produced without man-made chemicals, hormones, pesticides, dyes.