Farm Fresh Foods throughout Florida

Posts Tagged ‘eggs’

The Incredible, Edible Egg

Sunday, January 19th, 2014

Farm Fresh Pastured Egg (brown) vs Factory Egg (white)

Pasture Eggs vs Factory Eggs

Trouble sleeping? Feeling foggy? Bad Mood?
Eat an egg. Or two. Eggs are a superfood, providing building blocks for healthy neurotransmitter functioning including boosting serotonin, dopamine,   nor- epinephrine, epinephrine and acetylcholine levels in the brain while providing a host of essential nutrients.
Rich in protein, eggs are high in tryptophan which is involved in the production of serotonin, the “feel-good hormone.” Low levels of tryptophan (and thus, serotonin) are associated with depression, insomnia, weight gain, and other health issues. Increasing your intake of eggs boosts tryptophan which in turn increases serotonin. This boost brings with it a natural uplifting of mood and improvements in sleep, mood regulation, and overall feelings of well-being.
Eggs are also high in tyrosine which is involved in the production of dopamine, nor- epinephrine and epinephrine. Why is this important? These neurotransmitters are responsible for mental alertness and activity, energy, cognition, concentration, motivation and memory creation and storage. Tyrosine is also crucial to the production of thyroid hormones.
Egg yolks are an abundant source of choline, which is vital to the metabolism of fat. Choline is the building block for acetylcholine which is vital for concentration, memory storage and recall, focus, muscle coordination, thought and cognition.
Furthermore, research has confirmed that eggs do not in fact raise cholesterol and are part of a heart-healthy diet. The yolks are a healthy fat, providing countless vital nutrients to the brain and heart, including lutein and zeaxanthin, two antioxidants associated with improving vision and eye health.
There’s just one catch: if you want the full benefit of nutrients and health, opt for pastured or free-range eggs. Also opt for raw as much as possible, as cooking (especially microwaving) destroys many of the nutrients. Besides providing a superior source of nutrients, pastured/free-range eggs have a significantly lower risk of contamination by disease-causing bacteria than their caged counterparts.
Other benefits to pastured eggs are that the hens live a more humane life, free to roam instead of being confined and jam-packed into cages. More time in the sun leads to increased vitamin d, and being free to eat a more natural, varied diet, i.e. more protein and nutrients as opposed to grain, soy, corn, additives, hormones, chemicals, and antibiotics, leads to nutritionally superior eggs.
In fact, studies have shown far higher nutrient content in grass-fed, pastured eggs than factory eggs, including:

-two to four times more omega-3 fatty acids
-10% less fat; 25% less satured fat
-40-70% more vitamin A
-34% less cholesterol
-3 times more vitamin E
-7 times more beta carotene
-three to six times more vitamin D
-70% more vitamin B12
-50% more folic acid

Pastured eggs are richer in color, plumper, thicker, and tastier than their factory counterparts. This is truly a case of you get what you pay for; pastured eggs are nutrient dense, tastier, and far more humane than factory eggs which are provide far less nutritional value and taste, and are raised in deplorable conditions. “You’d have to eat 5 supermarket eggs to get the same amount of vitamin D from one pastured egg.”

The bottom line: shop farm fresh, support local, and know that you’re getting the healthiest, nutritionally superior foods procured under humane and healthy conditions. That’s good for the body, the mind and the soul.

This is precisely what Dr. Steve Moreau has done for you as part of his service making farm fresh grass-fed, pastured, nutritionally (and ethically) superior food available in Central Florida. He offers pastured eggs with no growth hormones, antibiotics or chemicals, which he assures as such after his own personal inspection of local farms. His service supports local farmers while providing a variety of healthy and humanely produced eggs, meats, dairy, greens, and other farm fresh, grass-fed, pastured, and nutrient dense foods for convenient purchase from one of several Central Florida locations.

Traditional Diet for Babies

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2009
Click for More Info

Click for More Info

Written by Kenda Roberstson and Steve Moreau

What Should You Feed Your Baby?

Many parents wonder if it is safe to feed their babies raw milk. The answer is an emphatic YES, as long as you know the raw milk comes from a clean and reliable source.

It is also best if the milk comes from cows that eat a more natural diet of green grass, hay and root vegetables.

While mother’s milk is the most ideal for your baby, raw cow’s milk produced safely is not dangerous in spite of what public health propagandists have lead you to believe. Raw milk actually contains enzymes and antibodies that make it less susceptible to bacterial contamination than pasteurized milk, while many toxins that cause diarrhea and other ailments survive the pasteurization process. Raw milk is easier for your baby to digest than pasteurized and less likely to cause cramps, constipation and allergies.

Many doctors warn that feeding cereal grains to babies too early can lead to grain allergies. Because your baby’s digestive system is better equipped to supply enzymes for digestion of fats and proteins rather than carbohydrates, baby’s first solid foods should be animal foods.

Some experts recommend feeding an egg yolk per day, starting at four months. Eggs from pasture-fed hens are rich in the omega-3 long-chain fatty acids that may be lacking in cow’s milk. These fatty acids are essential for brain development.

Cod liver oil can also be added to baby’s foods for additional omega-3s and vitamin D.

Around 10 months of age, you can introduce meats such as grass-fed beef liver, and mashed fruits and vegetables, and raw buttermilk or yogurt. Avoid fruit juices, as they are mostly sugar.

Of course your baby will come in contact with processed junk foods sooner or later. But if you help your child develop a taste for nutritious foods in infancy then he or she will make better food choices for a healthier future.

nourishing-traditions1Source: Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats by Sally Fallon with Mary G. Enig, PhD.

E.coli Beef Recall! ( 8th this year)

Monday, June 29th, 2009

Written by Kenda Roberstson and Steve Moreau

Looks like the nation has just identified the 8th beef recall of 2009. The recall involved E. coli O157:H7 and is just the latest in a string of incidents. E. coli O157:H7 was first recognized as a cause of illness in 1982 and today accounts for the majority of food borne illnesses.

Studies have shown that grass-fed cattle are less prone to developing this deadly strain of E. coli. here is the link for more info: http://www.eatwild.com/foodsafety.html.  All the  more reason to buy direct from local farmers who grow grass fed beef,  raw milk and free range eggs.  It should come as no surprise that cattle on the typical grain feedlot are the major source of this problem.  A predominant grain diet has negative effects on the cattle’s  digestive tract and makes them prone to developing this strain of E.coli.

Instead of the draconian National Animal Identification System(http://farmtoconsumer.org/nais.html) how about animal feed reform and changing the feedlot  system.  Better yet find a local farmer who does  grass-fed beef and ask to visit the farm and ask about their feeding program, and do they use hormone implants?  Remember grass is the natural diet for cattle.

Autism: A Nutritional Approach

Friday, May 22nd, 2009

Written by Kenda Roberstson and Steve Moreau

Good nutrition is essential to the prevention, treatment and cure of many illnesses, diseases and conditions. And that includes autism.

Defeat Autism Now, an organization founded by a group of doctors whose children suffer from the condition, found that diet plays a crucial role in treating children with many disorders including autism, Asperger’s sydrome, ADD, ADHD and ODD.

Various studies have reveled that children with autism do not have the right amount of beneficial bacterial in their digestive system. Since 85% of the body’s immune system is in the gut, without these bacteria it is hard for their bodies to absorb nutrients to build a strong, healthy immune and digestive system. Their diets also lack the necessary nutritional fats that are fundamental to developing brain cells.

According to the Body Ecology diet (bodyecology.com) and the book “Gut and Psychology Syndrome,” by Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride MD, children with any type of brain disorder can benefit from eating grass-fed raw dairy, including milk, cream, butter, cultured yogurt and fermented kefir.

Grass-fed raw dairy contains the crucial omega-3 fatty acids needed for brain function, good bacteria for a healthy digestive system, and plentiful vitamins A and D for proper growth and development. It is also rich in the raw, saturated fatty acids (similar to those found in mother’s milk) that nourish the brain and intestinal lining.

Other foods to consider as nutritional powerhouses are grass-fed beef, free-range poultry, organic eggs, fruits and vegetables – all produced without man-made chemicals, hormones, pesticides, dyes, or additives.

Local Food in Orlando

Saturday, March 21st, 2009

Written by Kenda Roberstson and Steve Moreau

As many of you might have already noticed, finding local sources of local farm fresh food is difficult.  The Orlando metro area, which once had thriving agricultural enterprises, instead is filled with urban sprawl.  Fortunately, the times are changing.  People in Orlando are searching high and low for free-range eggs, fresh milk, local organic produce, and much more.  Many have formed co-ops and bring in food from around the US.  While commendable, I’m of the opinion that we should support and source food from around Florida and Orlando as much as possible.  There some obvious obstacles of course, chief among them is the price of land.  Second we need suppliers of natural, non-toxic feed for the animals.  Third, we need laws to encourage the growth of local meat processing operations.  I do not mean the large slaughterhouses on an industrial scale but rather small mom and pop operations.  Smaller operations are easier to keep clean and you can build a personal relationship with them.  Can you imagine the return of your local butcher that offers grass-fed meat, lamb and truly pastured chickens?  So what can you do?  Buy local first.  Follow the 80-20 rule.  Try to buy a larger portion of your food locally and the remainder from conventional sources.  Second, write your local, state and federal representatives to make your voice heard.  In these economic troubles, buying locally will have an immediate positive impact.

Please visit these resources below to get started:

Click on Find Local Food

http://www.holisticlivingschool.org/coop

/

http://apmarket.wordpress.com/

http://www.localharvest.org/