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Gut Health and Eating Disorders

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

Eating disorders like anorexia and bulimia plague roughly 10% of the population, and those numbers are even higher among teenage girls. With the research linking depression, schizophrenia, anxiety, and other mood disorders to biochemical imbalances, researchers have been looking into similar links with eating disorders.

A recent study uncovered a very strong link between “a protein made by intestinal bacteria” and disordered eating behaviors. Apparently antibodies are made to fight this protein, antibodies that end up reacting unfavorably with satiety hormones. Higher levels of these neutralizing antibodies were associated with higher severity of eating disorder symptoms. The potential for healing strategies as a result of uncovering this information are enormous, particularly given the relation to these antibodies and regulation of “feeding, energy regulation and anxiety.”

Researchers are now “working to develop a blood test based detection of the bacterial protein.”

As our recent blog articles have highlighted, a healthy and balanced gut is vital to overall health. Research is increasingly uncovering linkages between the gut and other areas of health, including allergies, autoimmune disorders, arthritis, pain, chronic fatigue, some cancers, acne, Autism, ADHD/ADD, and mood disorders.

Though much of it is anecdotal or in early research stages, many people have found that by repairing their gut health, their symptoms of these and other issues lessen dramatically – or disappear altogether. Countless people have reported decreased anxiety, increased energy and mood, reductions in pain, and other health improvements simply by balancing their gut bacteria.

The question then, is how can we restore and rebalance our gut health?

Probiotics and prebiotics. While pharmaceutical grade supplements can offer great benefits, food sources are the best way to optimize your gut health. Eating fermented foods like saukerkraut, kefir, yogurt, and fermented vegetables are an excellent and easy way to improve your health – and balance your gut bacteria. Start small, you don’t want to shock your system, then gradually increase your intake of probiotic foods. As always, opt for non-GMO, organic, grass-fed sources, as these have been shown to be significantly higher in nutrients and benefits – with the added bonus of supporting local business.

Coconut Oil- Goods news from the Tropics

Thursday, July 9th, 2009

Written by Kenda Roberstson and Steve Moreau

Even though coconut oil has been used as a cooking oil for thousands of years, it has gotten a bum rap in the last 20 years or so. In fact, highly saturated coconut oil was listed as an ingredient in many cookbooks at the end of the 19th century.

But then came the campaign against saturated fat, and the promotion of polyunsaturated fats, such as flaxseed, canola, soybean, safflower, corn, and other seed and nut oils, commonly known as the Vegetable Oil Lobby. This new industry saw greater profits in vegetable oils but first had to demonize the competition.

Saturated fats have been supposedly linked to high cholesterol and heart disease, multiple sclerosis and other ailments. If this is true, then why is it that people who live in tropical climates and eat a diet high in coconut oil are healthier, have less heart disease, cancer, and colon problems than unsaturated fat eaters?

Many researchers have reported that coconut oil actually lowers cholesterol, is anti-aging and helps people lose weight because of its ability to stimulate the thyroid.

Since the 1960s, researchers have known about the antiviral, antibacterial, and anti-fungal properties of the medium chain fatty acids/triglycerides found in coconut oil. Research has shown that the tropical oil inactivates microorganisms such as bacteria, yeast, fungi and viruses.

In 1987, Lim-Sylianco published a 50-year literature review showing coconut oil’s anti-cancer properties. In colon and breast cancer, coconut oil was found to be far more protective than unsaturated oils. For example: 32% of corn oil eaters got colon cancer but only 3% of coconut oil eaters did.

Coconut oil is stable. While unsaturated oils become rancid very quickly, even after one year at room temperature, coconut oil shows no evidence of rancidity.

When buying coconut oil, choose brands that are organic extra-virgin expeller pressed.

Other healthful saturated fats come from grass-fed raw dairy products, grass-fed beef, pastured poultry and farm fresh eggs.

Resources: www.coconutoil.com

How the Pottenger Cat Study Relates to Human Health.

Wednesday, July 1st, 2009

Written by Kenda Roberstson and Steve Moreau

In 1932, Dr. Francis M. Pottenger, Jr., a physician and researcher who had successfully treated patients with TB, asthma, allergies and emphysema by putting them on a diet of raw butter, cream and eggs, decided to experiment with a raw food diet involving cats.

In one study group, the felines ate only raw milk and raw meat, while in the other groups they ate some raw meat mixed with pasteurized milk and cooked meat. During the 10-year study, Pottenger discovered that only the all-raw group maintained good health generation after generation. They had excellent bone structure, few parasites, easy pregnancies and gentle dispositions.

The groups whose diet was partially cooked developed “facial deformities,” including narrowed faces, crowded jaws, frail bones and weakened ligaments. They harbored parasites, developed diseases and had difficult pregnancies. The female cats became much more aggressive compared to those on the raw diet. The males on the other hand were unnaturally timid and exhibited lower sexual interest.  After just three generations, young animals died before reaching adulthood and stopped reproducing.

While Pottenger’s cat experiments do not mean humans should eat only raw foods, it is a testament as to the potential consequences of a diet without the nutrients provided by real grass-fed foods.  Chiefly the fat-soluble Vitamins A,D,and E. Pottenger believed that when the human diet produces facial deformities like crowded teeth, degenerative diseases will soon emerge if the diet is followed for several generations.

With western civilization’s love of refined, highly sweetened convenience foods and low-fat items, could it be that Americans are now experiencing an epidemic of degenerative diseases as a result of generations who were raised on these foods?

Preventing disease now and for generations to come is one reason we need to get back to a more natural diet consisting of grass-fed beef, free-range poultry, organic eggs and produce, raw milk and cheese – all produced without man-made chemicals, hormones, pesticides, dyes.

Allergies and Your Diet

Sunday, June 7th, 2009
alllergy-picture

Raw milk may help Allergies

Written by Kenda Roberstson and Steve Moreau

Our bodies are complex systems that easily can be thrown out of balance by toxins in our environment and the foods we eat. If your body isn’t able to compensate and recover from exposure to these toxic substances, chemicals and processed foods, then you could develop sensitivity, or what is known as an allergy.

Allergists estimate that 80 percent of people have allergies in one form or another and that number is growing partially due to what many believe is our “modern” diet. Allergies may appear as sneezing with a runny nose when they have an allergic reaction to pollen. Or you may develop asthma. Children can develop ADHD symptoms as a result of an allergic reaction to food, chemicals or pollens. Even conservative sources estimate that five percent of children with ADHD have their symptoms because of some type of allergic reaction.

The good news: A change in diet can do wonders to curb most allergies.

Studies show that most people’s sensitivities dramatically improve when they avoid sugar, most grains, and pasteurized dairy products. Replacing commercial milk with raw milk from grass-fed cows is usually well tolerated by most people and is highly health promoting. It is also helpful to eat products such as eggs, poultry, and beef from animals fed a natural diet, which does not include grains, and by consuming fresh organic produce — all produced without man-made chemicals, hormones, pesticides, dyes, or additives

Making certain that enough long-chain animal based omega-3 fats (DHA and EPA) are included in your diet is also important. Grass-fed raw dairy contains the crucial omega-3 fatty acids needed for brain function, good bacteria for a healthy digestive system, and plentiful vitamins A and D for proper growth and development. It is also rich in the raw, saturated fatty acids that nourish the brain and intestinal lining.

Eliminating allergies may not be as easy as drinking a glass of raw milk, but it is a good way to start.