Farm Fresh Foods throughout Florida

Archive for the ‘feeding babies’ Category

Infertility and the Role of farm fresh foods

Wednesday, August 26th, 2009

baby-picture1

Written by Kenda Roberstson and Steve Moreau

Having trouble conceiving? Before you spend time and money on expensive tests and treatments, you may want to evaluate your diet.

A study conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health found that women eating low-fat diets had a lower chance of conceiving.
http://www.dairyreporter.com/Industry-markets/Low-fat-dairy-raises-infertility-risk-study

During the eight-year study, researchers documented the health and nutrition of 18,555 women: 438 were diagnosed with anovulatory infertility, a condition that accounts for a third of female fertility problems.

The women in the study who ate only low-fat or skim-milk dairy products, had an 85 percent chance of experiencing infertility. However, those who ate full-fat dairy foods were 27 percent less likely to have the condition.

The study concluded that women trying to conceive should eat up to two servings of full-fat dairy foods a day, including whole milk, cheese, ice cream and cream cheese. These suggestions are similiar to what the Weston A Price Foundation advises. Though of course WAPF speak about the benefits of grass-fed milk and pastured eggs an grass-fed beef.

Katie Singer, author of “The Garden of Fertility” and follower of the nutritional principles of Dr. Weston A. Price, advises women to eat more fat from whole grass-fed raw dairy foods, grass-fed beef, and free-range eggs and poultry, especially if they are trying to conceive.

Singer says many women in her fertility workshops have irregular or nonexistent ovulation. Because of this, she believes they are at increased risk of uterine cancer, polycystic ovarian syndrome and infertility.

After Singer’s students eliminate sugar and tofu from their diets, many of them begin ovulating immediately. However, other students need to add whole dairy and animal fats to their diets to regulate their bodies.

“I’ve seen many women’s temperatures increase significantly when they cut soy out of their diets,” Singer said. “Yet others become ovulatory after they cut back on sugar and increase their consumption of cod liver oil, butter and eggs.”

So the take home message for women is to ditch the low-fat dogma and return to real foods…foods that have nourished human pregnancies before so-called experts convinced us otherwise. Fortunately access to local farm foods are increasing in the Orlando area.

Traditional Diet for Babies

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2009
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Written by Kenda Roberstson and Steve Moreau

What Should You Feed Your Baby?

Many parents wonder if it is safe to feed their babies raw milk. The answer is an emphatic YES, as long as you know the raw milk comes from a clean and reliable source.

It is also best if the milk comes from cows that eat a more natural diet of green grass, hay and root vegetables.

While mother’s milk is the most ideal for your baby, raw cow’s milk produced safely is not dangerous in spite of what public health propagandists have lead you to believe. Raw milk actually contains enzymes and antibodies that make it less susceptible to bacterial contamination than pasteurized milk, while many toxins that cause diarrhea and other ailments survive the pasteurization process. Raw milk is easier for your baby to digest than pasteurized and less likely to cause cramps, constipation and allergies.

Many doctors warn that feeding cereal grains to babies too early can lead to grain allergies. Because your baby’s digestive system is better equipped to supply enzymes for digestion of fats and proteins rather than carbohydrates, baby’s first solid foods should be animal foods.

Some experts recommend feeding an egg yolk per day, starting at four months. Eggs from pasture-fed hens are rich in the omega-3 long-chain fatty acids that may be lacking in cow’s milk. These fatty acids are essential for brain development.

Cod liver oil can also be added to baby’s foods for additional omega-3s and vitamin D.

Around 10 months of age, you can introduce meats such as grass-fed beef liver, and mashed fruits and vegetables, and raw buttermilk or yogurt. Avoid fruit juices, as they are mostly sugar.

Of course your baby will come in contact with processed junk foods sooner or later. But if you help your child develop a taste for nutritious foods in infancy then he or she will make better food choices for a healthier future.

nourishing-traditions1Source: Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats by Sally Fallon with Mary G. Enig, PhD.