Farm Fresh Foods throughout Florida

Archive for April, 2015

Grass-Fed Beef: A Culinary Delight

Thursday, April 30th, 2015

There’s a reason fine steak restaurants opt for grass-fed beef.

Buying grass-fed foods come with the added bonus of culinary delight. As you prepare your grass-fed beef, or perhaps enjoy a bowl of thick, creamy pastured yogurt, your senses will be delighted. Mealtime will no longer be just about scarfing down a whatever meal. Instead, it will be a culinary explosion of flavor, texture and nutrients, food as it was originally intended. Fuel your body with superior nutrition even as you wow your senses with mouthwatering and delicious tastes.

Prepare your taste buds for a feast of farm fresh delight with these tips for cooking your grass-fed beef:

Medium-rare temperature is ideal, however, if you prefer your meat to be more well done, cook it at low temperatures (slow cooker is ideal) and add sauce to keep it moist.

Marinate your grass-fed beef in the fridge; opt for a recipe that doesn’t mask the natural flavor of the meat, but that will enhance the moisture content, especially since grass-fed meat is lower in fat than grain-fed.

Do not thaw grass-fed beef in the microwave. Thaw overnight in the refrigerator, or place it in cold water for a few minutes in its original vacuum-sealed packaging. Don’t leave sitting at room temperature for longer than 30 minutes.

Tenderize your grass-fed meat to breakdown the tough connective tissue.

Always pre-heat grill, oven, crock pot, pan, etc. before cooking grass-fed beef.

Note: Grass-fed beef cooks a bit faster than grain-fed beef. Keep an eye on the temperature with a cooking thermometer. Remember that the meat will continue to cook after you remove it from the heat, so remove it from heat once it reaches a temp that is 10 degrees lower than your desired temperature.

Let the grass-fed beef sit in a warm, covered place for 8-10 minutes to allow the juices to redistribute.

Pan-searing is an excellent – and easy – way to cook your grass-fed steak. After you’ve seared it on high heat, drop the temperature to low, and add butter and garlic.

For grilling, quickly sear the meat on high heat on both sides, then finish with heat reduced to medium or low. Baste to add moisture.

What is your favorite grass-fed beef recipe? Share it on our Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/427279787374830/

Grass-fed Beef – Easy Crock Pot Recipe

Wednesday, April 15th, 2015

If you have never had grass-fed beef before, you are in for a treat. My personal favorite is the grass-fed brisket, but a good grass-fed chuck roast or round roast would be perfect for this recipe as well.

Use your favorite cut of grass-fed beef, and enjoy a tasty meal free from antibiotics, hormones, fillers, or grain feed.

Grass-fed Beef – Easy Crock Pot Recipe

  • 3 lbs Frozen Grass-fed beef
  • 3 Cups Burgundy
  • 1 Thinly Sliced Onion
  • 1 Cup Beef Broth
  • 1 Tbsp Worcestershire Sauce
  • 1 Bay Leaf
  • 1 Cup Water

Combine ingredients in crock pot, set on low, and cook all day (approximately 8 hours). Enjoy your tender grass-fed beef with your favorite farm fresh vegetables – or put some carrots and potatoes right on in with the grass-fed beef for an easy yet delicious meal for the family.

Nutritional Value of Grass-fed & Pastured Foods

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

A picture is worth a thousand words. See for yourself – pastured and grass-fed foods including pastured eggs, grass-fed beef, chicken, cheese, raw milk, pastured butter, grass-fed chicken, etc. are significantly higher in essential nutrients like CLA, Vitamin E, and Omega 3 Fatty Acids.

We’ve spotlighted the benefits of CLA in earlier blog articles, detailing its role in weight loss and lean muscle building and retention, cancer prevention, and countless other benefits.

Now we are going to spotlight another super-nutrient: Omega 3 Fatty Acids.

Research has found that Omega 3 fatty acids are extremely beneficial to the following:

Heart Health

Cholesterol Triglyceride Levels

Children’s Learning & Behavior

Short Bowel Syndrome in Children

Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke

Retinal and Brain Development in Infants

General Brain Function, Including Memory and Parkinson’s Disease

Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder – ADHD

Autoimmune Disorders, e.g. Lupus, Nephropathy

Osteoporosis

Crohn’s Disease

Certain Types of Cancer Including Breast, Colon and Prostrate

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Depression

Asthma

Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia

As with most nutrients, whole foods are the optimal source. Fish and nuts aren’t the only food source of omega 3 fatty acids. Grass-fed animals have 2-4xs the omega 3 fatty acid content as their grain-fed counterparts, with the added benefit of being lower in fat and calories.

Sources: Facts & Photos

www.americangrassfedbeef.com

eatwild.com

foodgraphs.net

providencefarmallnatural.com

Mercola.com